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Health and life sciences in Western Australia

Western Australia’s rapidly growing health and life sciences industry is underpinned by excellent research infrastructure. Western Australia is home to a number of highly-regarded medical research institutes and 5 universities such as:

  • the   Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research located at the QEII Medical Centre
  • the MTPConnect WA Life Sciences Hub  that connects the innovation community, attracts investment and fosters commercialisation
  • the Royal Perth Hospital Synapse Innovation Hub brings together healthcare innovators and entrepreneurs, and supports the commercialisation of new health concepts.

Incentives, grants and support

There is substantial funding to drive innovation and growth in the state’s burgeoning life sciences industry. 

The A$1.4billion Future Health Research and Innovation Fund has a range of  programs that offer secure, ongoing funding to health and medical researchers and innovators in Western Australia. The state’s A$16.7 million New Industries Fund supports new, emerging, and small-to medium businesses with a range of programs and initiatives including the intrinsically linked life sciences, cyber security and data science innovation hubs, the WA Innovator of the Year awards and the Innovation Vouchers Program.

Invest & Trade Western Australia  can work with you to assess your business requirements and connect you with relevant government and industry stakeholders.

Case studies

  • Researchers at The University of Western Australia’s Marshall Centre have developed a belt that uses proven acoustic technology to record and analyse gut noises. In conjunction with symptom data, the Noisy Guts acoustic belt diagnoses Irritable Bowel Syndrome with over 90% accuracy.
  • A third drug treatment, Casimersen, developed by a Western Australian research team–USA partnership for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, has achieved US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accelerated approval. Each drug is designed to treat a specific type of dystrophin gene mutation.
  • The Perth-based Ear Science Institute Australia has developed ClearDrum, a world-first implant for the treatment of chronic middle ear disease. The off-the-shelf, near-permanent implant can correct ear drum perforations in a single, straightforward surgical procedure, and is slated for clinical trial in 2021.